Family history of endometrial cancer or colorectal cancer

A A
Convincing: There is compelling and consistent evidence that the factor increases or decreases the risk of endometrial cancer. Increases risk

There is convincing evidence that a family history of endometrial cancer is associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. A family history of colorectal cancer and Lynch syndrome  is also associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer.

Studies have looked at the risk of endometrial cancer in women who have a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has (or had) endometrial cancer. Around 3 in 100 women (3.1%) who have an affected first degree relative will develop endometrial cancer compared with just under 2 in 100 women (1.8%) who do not have an affected first degree relative.

The risk of endometrial cancer is also slightly higher (about 1.2 times higher) for women who have a first degree relative (mother, father, sister, brother, daughter, son) who has (or had) colorectal cancer compared with women without a family history of colorectal cancer.  This increase in risk is only seen if the family also has Lynch syndrome.

Current evidence suggests that only a small number of cases of endometrial cancer are due to family history. A family history may be due to genetic changes that lead to a higher likelihood of developing endometrial cancer. In addition, family members often have similar environments and lifestyles as each other. These shared backgrounds could also contribute to the increased endometrial cancer risk in women with a family history of endometrial cancer.

Further information can be found at: